Restricted movements (stay at home)

Restricting your movements means staying at home as much as possible to avoid contact with other people.

When there's a chance you may have COVID-19 (coronavirus), restricting your movements helps to stop the spread of the virus.

Vaccine appointments

Do not get your COVID-19 vaccine while you are restricting your movements. To get a new appointment date, reply to your appointment text with the word 'New' or phone HSE Live on 1800 700 700.

When you should restrict your movements

Restrict your movements for 14 days if you are not fully vaccinated and you:

In these situations, there is a chance you may have COVID-19 too. You can spread the virus even if you do not have symptoms. By restricting your movements, you can keep other people safe.

Read advice on international travel on gov.ie

If you are fully vaccinated or had COVID-19 in the past 9 months

You do not need to restrict your movements if you:

  • are fully vaccinated against COVID-19
  • had a positive proven COVID-19 PCR test in the past 9 months

But a contact tracer may ask you to restrict your movements if you are a close contact of a variant of concern. Always follow their advice.

If you develop symptoms of COVID-19, self-isolate (stay in your room) and get a COVID-19 PCR test.

What we mean by fully vaccinated against COVID-19

You are fully vaccinated:

  • 7 days after your second Pfizer/BioNTech dose - also known as ‘Comirnaty’
  • 15 days after your second AstraZeneca dose - this vaccine may be called ‘Vaxzevria’ or ‘Covishield’
  • 14 days after your second Moderna dose - also known as ‘Spikevax’
  • 14 days after the Johnson & Johnson vaccine ‘Janssen’ - this is a single dose vaccine

How to restrict your movements

Avoid social situations and contact with other people as much as you can. Stay at home or in your accommodation as much as possible.

You can still go outside to exercise by yourself as long as you keep 2 metres away from other people.

Don't

  • do not go to work, unless you work on your own and can completely avoid other people

  • do not go to school or college

  • do not use public transport

  • do not have visitors at your home

  • do not visit others, even if you usually care for them

  • do not go to the shops or pharmacy - shop online or ask family or friends to help

  • do not drop off or collect your children from school - if you have to go, avoid other people and remain in your car

  • do not go to gatherings such as weddings or funerals

  • do not meet face-to-face with people at high-risk from COVID-19

If you are an essential worker and do not have any symptoms, talk to your employer.

When you can stop restricting your movements

Restrict your movements for 14 days if you're a close contact and you:

  • are not fully vaccinated
  • have not had COVID-19 in the past 9 months

Do this from the last date you were in contact with that person. If you’re not sure when that was, restrict your movements until the date you were told by contact tracing.

You can stop restricting your movements when all of these apply:

  • 10 days have passed since you were last in contact with the person who tested positive. 
  • You get a negative COVID-19 test result.
  • You do not have any symptoms of COVID-19.

How to get a COVID-19 test

Caring for someone who cannot self-isolate

Follow the advice on caring for someone who cannot self-isolate

If you live with someone who is restricting their movements

If you live with someone who is restricting their movements, you do not need to restrict your movements as long as they do not have any symptoms of COVID-19.

If you live with someone who has symptoms of COVID-19

Restrict your movements if you:

  • are not fully vaccinated against COVID-19
  • have not had COVID-19 in the past 9 months
  • are fully vaccinated against COVID-19 but you feel unwell

The person who has symptoms should behave as if they have COVID-19 and:

You should both wear a medical face mask.

If you live with someone waiting for test results

You may need to restrict your movements if you live with someone who has symptoms of COVID-19 and is waiting on a test result.

Restrict your movements if you:

  • are not fully vaccinated against COVID-19
  • have not had COVID-19 in the past 9 months

If their test comes back negative, you can return to your normal activities. If their test is positive, you will become a close contact and should continue to restrict your movements.

You do not need to restrict your movements if you do not have symptoms and you:

  • are fully vaccinated against COVID-19
  • had a positive COVID-19 PCR test in the past 9 months

Last updated: 7 September 2021 at 6.20pm