Breastfeeding twins or triplets

You can still breastfeed if you have twins, triplets or even more. If your babies were born premature, breastfeeding is even more important.

How to get started

At the start, you may find it easier to feed them separately. This will help you to build your confidence. You can feed triplets with two babies together and then one alone, or rotated one by one.

Aim to give as much breast milk as possible to your babies. The amount of breast milk you produce depends on how often your babies feed.

It will take time to find a position that you feel comfortable with. You may find it easier to concentrate on one baby at a time. If you'd like to feed two babies at once, ask your midwife or partner to help you when positioning and attaching.

Breastfeeding your babies together

When you are confident one baby is well attached to your breast, you can try feeding two babies together. This will save you time.

Try the following positions to see what works best for you.

upright latch position
Upright latch position
football and cradle pose
Football and cradle pose
front cross position
Front cross position
double football position
Double football position

In the early days, it's easier to feed in a bed or on a big sofa. Position yourself in the middle with plenty of cushions around you. This will help to support your back and to lift up your babies if needed.

Milk supply

Your breast milk is produced on demand. This means that the more you feed, the more you make. You will have plenty of milk for your babies if you feed on demand.

If your babies are small or born a little early, your midwife or public health nurse will help. They can support you to make sure your babies are feeding well and gaining weight.

Mum-of-twins Deirdre McCarthy shares her breastfeeding tips

Deirdre McCarthy shares her advice on breastfeeding twins

Getting support

Breastfeeding support groups are a great place to get advice and to meet other mothers.

Breastfeeding support groups are run by:

Page last reviewed: 15 March 2019
Next review due: 15 March 2022

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